Responsible Business (CSR)

Looking for more ways to successfully implement CSR strategy into your mid-size enterprise?

When it comes to getting ahead in the world of business, mid-size enterprises often find themselves in something of a no man’s land. Small businesses can be agile, edgy and experimental. Big business has heft, budget and significant data driving direction. If you fall somewhere between these two camps, specific advice on important strategic topics such as CSR can be lacking - but in this article, we’ll aim to redress the balance.

If you’re running an ecommerce brand, you’ll be well aware of the growing prominence that CSR holds within the sector. We’re seeing increasing numbers of online retailers aligning their marketing to a more ethical “mission-led” position – and CSR has an important contributing role to play.

The Growing Importance Of CSR In Business 

A proactive approach to CSR is an essential component to the success of modern day businesses. Growing public awareness of social and environmental issues and a rising number of brands answering the call to step up and do their part means that CSR in global supply chains and sustainability for corporates more broadly has become a high priority.

Corporate social responsibility – commonly abbreviated to CSR – is an increasingly well-established component of modern business strategy. While the ubiquity of the practice might be growing, many mistakenly assume that the benefits of CSR begin and end with positive “optics” – non-essential, but still nice to have.

CSR initiatives within the corporate environment are growing in prominence. As businesses wake up to the importance of a visible and effective corporate responsibility strategy, an increasing amount of attention and emphasis is being placed on CSR, from the boardroom to the commercial marketplace.

The case for corporate sustainability is mounting. An ever-increasing number of organisations are starting to step up and make changes when it comes to the environmental impact that their activities create. This is not just good news for the planet – increasingly, it’s becoming essential for the progression and success of businesses.

The concept of corporate philanthropy is nothing new. Businesses have been giving back to the communities around them in some form or another for as long as formalised trade has existed. The first CSR initiatives are thought to date back as far as 1700 BC in Ancient Mesopotamia.

Even before the exaggerating influence of Covid-19, the importance of CSR for businesses was rising. An estimated 90% of companies on the S&P 500 index published a CSR report in 2019, up from just 20% in 2011. Today, CSR policies represent a key way of communicating and actioning core brand values – important for employee engagement, but also for recruitment and general public reputation.

What is a Donor-Advised Fund (DAF)?

A Donor-Advised Fund, or DAF, is a philanthropic giving vehicle hosted by a registered charity (KindLink Foundation). It allows individuals or organisations (DAF account holder) to establish a foundation account and instruct donations without having to register a charity themselves. This scheme can save cost and time while it is much more flexible and easy to manage than a regular registered nonprofit organisation.

Corporate and employee fundraising if one of the main ways businesses engage with local causes and their teams. It is the easiest way to gather your teams, do something fun and use the power of your friends, family, and colleagues to do something good. From running marathons to rowing and cycling challenges, it is an amazingly efficient way to collect donations and build the team spirit.