csr

Your employees are volunteering for unique charities that spark their interest, but their volunteer hours might be going overlooked. Are your employees communicating their volunteering outside of the office?

The leading CSR trend of 2019 is the transition away from glossy, brand-heavy content to an authentic portrayal of social giving. Who is producing this new content? It’s not your costly public relations agency. 

It’s your employees.

Employee branding is the strategic use of employee experiences and brand loyalty to market your business. Who knows your product better than those selling it? Consumers want to see your CSR efforts on an individual level, and your employees are the perfect candidate for the job. 

In an industry survey, 88 per cent of millennial employees said they feel more loyal to a company that helps them contribute to social and environmental issues. Young workers are willing to receive pay cuts for increased CSR activities, but does philanthropy belong in the office? 

Does your new spring jacket match your sustainable values? Only 6 per cent of procurement leaders claims their supply chains are entirely transparent, according to the Business Continuity Institute, and the garment and textiles industry particularly fails to be transparent in the wake of a fast fashion crisis.

You spend the majority of your waking hours working. As an employee, you should be feeling purposeful at the office or at least have a decadent cup of coffee available.

Stakeholders and customers no longer want to hear your business’s sustainable initiatives. They expect sustainability to be already at the center of your business model.

Recruiters are searching for creative, new talent, and aspiring workers are looking for employers keen on community engagement and sustainable innovations. Millennials are attracted to corporate social responsibility, and CSR is often a key topic during the hiring process.

Corporate Social Responsibility, or CSR, is becoming increasingly important for SMEs, but it can sometimes seem confusing or overwhelming to know how to get started.

The world’s largest companies boast CSR teams who deliver major programmes throughout their supply chain. They promote and adhere to benchmarking and other international standards, such as the London Benchmarking Group, the Dow Jones Sustainability Index, BITC’s Corporate Responsibility Index and the Global Reporting Initiative.

 

These days, a CSR policy and plan are becoming necessities for mid-sized law firms and businesses, but simply having one is not enough. Does your organisation’s CSR policy or plan avoid these five common pitfalls?

 

1. It was designed by copying someone else’s policy

Learning from what your competitors, clients and friends are doing is fine.

Copying what they’ve done on CSR is pointless.

Business Social Impact programs, also known as Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) initiatives, have been questioned for many years and looked with skepticism for their role in the business strategy and actual impact on charities and society.

Below we will look into why such initiatives can be key to business success, as well as what digital tools are available for managing such a program.